The Fashion Archaeologist - Online Photo Gallery

A SHOWCASE OF OUR AUTHENTICALLY REPLICATED ANTIQUE GARMENTS - VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE!
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2 viewsThis blouse goes beautifully under the Cape-Jacket/Mantelet (Pattern #1912-A-006. Aug 27, 2017
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1 viewsAnother version of Mantelet #1912-A-006 worn with this blouse #1912-A-003. Aug 27, 2017
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0 viewsThis design has the "pigeon-breasted" blousing at bottom typical of late Edwardian garments. Aug 27, 2017
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1 viewsWith "Tulip Skirt" (pattern #1912-A-010)Aug 27, 2017
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2 viewsThe pattern includes the optional matching fabric belt (purchased button trim).Aug 27, 2017
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2 viewsThe blouse is adjusted below the waist with a tie, as it was in the original design. This keeps the pigeon-breasted arrangement nicely in place under a skirt waistband. Aug 27, 2017
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0 viewsThe finished blouse, in lightweight cotton batiste, from the back (with self-fabric belt). Aug 27, 2017
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0 viewsThe classic version of this blouse, in lightweight batiste, as it would have been made in 1912. Aug 27, 2017
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0 viewsThis version, in bright lavender linen/cotton, was custom-made for a client who wanted this particular colour combination. Aug 27, 2017
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0 viewsVenise lace trim was used (rather than galloon lace) to create the embellishment. Aug 27, 2017
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0 viewsI made a special hidden buttoned placket on this version, as the client did not want the buttons visible. Aug 27, 2017
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0 viewsThe chevron shape of the tucked sections stands out well in this darker colour. Aug 27, 2017
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3 viewsAug 27, 2017
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6 viewsSchematic showing how this Edwardian construction technique closes the side, underarm and sleeve seam all in one process, while fitting the underarm area neatly and smoothly (unlike simple "kimono" sleeves, which tend to bunch up under the arm unless a gusset is added). Aug 27, 2017
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4 viewsNOTE: Click on any photo in this album to see close-up details! Aug 27, 2017
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5 viewsShowing step 1(c) of Sewing Instructions -- Here the fabric yardage has already been folded in half (fold mark shown as centre front), and the edge of the first tuck has been pressed.
PLEASE NOTE: In the sample blouse shown in these photos, I intentionally spaced the first tuck further out from centre front for design purposes for the client. The usual spacing from C.F. for the 1st tuck should be 1-1/4" (3.25cm), but you can alter the spacing (and/or the depth and number of tucks) as long as it all fits within the marked Tucked Section.
Aug 27, 2017
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3 viewsThe completed gown ("summer version") in cream silk with green silk satin bands, exactly as described in the original 1912 French text, and the 1912 fashion sketch (centre).

Available as our pattern #1912-A-029 in our Etsy shop (PDF version) and eBay store (paper version, as available).
Aug 23, 2016
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4 viewsThe "winter version" of this gown in merlot-coloured fine wool, with black satin contrast bands. Aug 23, 2016
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6 viewsAug 23, 2016
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3 viewsA close-up view of the waist stay (petersham) being sewn on. Shown from the inside (wrong side) of the dress. Aug 23, 2016
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2 viewsShowing the waist stay (petersham) being sewn on. See Step 9 of the Sewing Instructions included with this pattern.

This petersham helps to keep the dress in place where intended -- that is, about 4.0cm (1-1/2") above the natural waistline when worn. The outside Waist Sash (Piece 14) can then serve a decorative purpose, without having to hold all the weight of the skirt.
Aug 23, 2016
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2 viewsA closer view of the two bands in place. The raw, short ends of the bands do not necessarily have to align with the raw Sleeve side edges, but they MUST lie past the Sleeve seam line so that they are caught into the Sleeve seam when it is sewn later. Aug 23, 2016
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2 viewsHere the lower Sleeve Contrast #1 has already been invisibly slip-stitched in place by hand onto the lace Sleeve Overlay. Sleeve Contrast #2 has been pinned, ready for hand stitching. The Contrast bands are slip-stitched along both top and bottom lengthwise edges.

They can be stitched on by machine if preferred, but this will create a much less attractive finish.
Aug 23, 2016
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2 viewsCLICK ON ANY PHOTO IN THIS ALBUM TO ENLARGE AND SEE DETAILSAug 23, 2016
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3 viewsThe photos in Sections A, C, D and E show the "winter" version made from this pattern 1912-A-029, in lightweight burgundy wool. See the pictures of completed dress in this album.

Also see more photos of the 2 sample gowns made from this pattern in our gallery (click on "Home" and scroll down to "Edwardian Day Gowns and Walking Suits")
Aug 23, 2016
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1 viewsAug 19, 2016
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1 viewsThese pictures show step-by-step the construction of the right and left bodice front opening edges. CLICK ON ANY PHOTO TO ENLARGE.

NOTE: The photos in this album show the bodice of a different dress from the other album. This dress was the "summer" version, in cream silk (see photos of finished dress in this album).
Aug 19, 2016
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6 viewsThis Section B shows the steps in sewing the unique method of closing the sleeve/underarm/bodice side seam all in one operation. This is found in many Edwardian bodices and blouses of ca. 1911 through 1913.
PLEASE NOTE: Some of the photos show details from Pattern #1911-A-017, but the seam is done in exactly the same way in Pattern #1912-A-003.

CLICK on any picture in the album to enlarge it and see more detail.
Aug 18, 2016
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13 viewsRemember you can click on any photo to see details! Aug 18, 2016
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